Mar 26 2017

Blue Stilton | Whole Wheel

This is a beautiful whole wheel of Blue Stilton – 2.5kg in total.

Universally recognised as the King of Cheeses, this traditional English Blue Stilton is smooth and boasts an awesome full bodied flavour.

There are only six dairies that are allowed to make Stilton. In order to carry the name, the cheese must be made in the counties of Derbyshire, Leicestershire or Nottinghamshire from local milk which is pasteurized before it has been used.

It also must be made in the traditional cylindrical shape that gives Stilton the formation of its own crust or coat.


Mar 7 2017

Bath Blue | Organic Cheese | Vegetarian Cheese

This is similar to a quality Stilton but even creamier and great tasting all year round. If you’re a Blue Cheese fan this simply has to be tried! Bath Blue is a creamy, smooth blue cheese with beautiful evenly spaced blue veins and a characteristic clean aroma, all in all a classic blue veined cheese made on contract from the milk of other organic herds and matured by us in our traditional stone built ripening rooms.

It is made at Park Farm in Kelston, just outside Bath. Graham Padfield is a third-generation farmer, but the first in his family to make cheese: he started, back in 1993, with Bath Soft Cheese, and this is now the name of the company.


Jan 14 2017

Port and Stilton | Christmas Selections

Hello cheese fans, we have here the biggest selection of stilton online in the UK. We have partnered with a mass of retailers to bring you this selection to help you find the stilton you like.

Whether you are after:

– Ham
– Port
– Claret
– A scoop

We have them – as long as you want them with Stilton.


Aug 12 2016

Stilton | Cropwell Bishop | Blue Cheese

 

 

History Of Stilton Cheese

Blue Stilton cheese has well over three hundred years of tradition flowing through its veins. The cheese has a PDO – Protected Designation of Origin – status (awarded in 1996) which means the king of cheeses can only be made in Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire or Derbyshire.

Cropwell Bishop Creamery

Cropwell Bishop Creamery is independently owned company in the Vale of Belvoir near the Nottinghamshire / Leicestershire border in England.

The Creamery is sewn into the fabric village life. Many employees live locally and there are several members of staff who have been with the Creamery for over 25 years.

The Cheeses

All cheeses are still made using traditional methods. Each year Cropwell Bishop Blue Stilton, Organic Blue Stilton and Blue Shropshire cheeses bring home many top prizes.

Cropwell Bishop Stilton

This is simply the best Stilton in the world – No exceptions!”

This has a wonderfully creamy Stilton that is beautifully presented which makes it one of the best presents available to any lover of good cheese.

This cheese comes as 500g and is suitable for vegetarians.

 


Jun 21 2016

Perl Las Blue – Organic Cheese

Fabulous Blue, described by the Organic Food awards judges as ‘lovely and unique with a strong lingering flavour’.

They’re absolutely spot on. Perl Las is a perfect organic blue cheese with a pale gold natural rind and a pale yellow paste with blue/ green veining.

It is made by Caws Cenarth Cheese is a small family enterprise in the heart of West Wales. It’s here that Welsh speaking Gwynfor and Thelma Adams have been farming for over 42 years. The cheesemaking business was established in April 1987 as a response to the E.C milk quotas which had threatened the viability of the family farm.

The cheese is still made entirely by hand and some of the cast iron presses are over a hundred years old.


Mar 3 2016

Blue Vinney | Dorset Cheese

Stilton lovers who fancy a change should try this lovely lighter, crumblier and savoury blue cheese.

This is an awesome version of blue cheeses because its made with skimmed cow’s milk – and it is also lower in fat!

Dorset Blue Vinny cheese could once be found in nearly every farmhouse in the county. It was an ideal way of using the ‘left-over’ milk after the cream had been skimmed off for butter-making. As a result the cheese had a very low fat content which was typically very hard, dry and crumbly, with little or no blue.

The “blueing” was encouraged by a number of methods (in the old days!), for example dragging mouldy horse harnesses through the milk before adding the rennet, storing the cheese on damp hessian bags or even next to mouldy boots.

You may be relieved to know that we no longer resort to any of these methods but instead the blue is introduced by means of a blue mould solution.

The cheese originated from a process that’s hundereds of years old but was revived in the 80s by cheese maker Mike Davies.